Published on January 28, 2020 by
  • Juxtapoz Magazine


Pop Surrealism has a special place in our hearts as Juxtapoz Magazine, whether it be the special universes created by Mark Ryden, Todd Schorr, Audrey Kawasaki or even Marion Peck, but how the city of Los Angeles helped shape that narrative. Yes, an essential part of the story of Pop Surrealism is Los Angeles, the heartbeat of entertainment but also a place of experimentation and grand ideas. At the core of this story is gallerist Merry Karnowsky, who since 1997, has supported and help evolve a scene that was once her backyard and now has become an international art movement.

From Ryden, Shepard Fairey, Greg “Craola” Simkins, Camille Rose Garcia and Mel Kadel, Merry Karnowsky Gallery (now KP Projects) has held it down in West Los Angeles for nearly 25 years. Not just an art gallery, Karnowsky’s openings saw a combination of celebrities and LA nightlife that is legendary, long before the world of art, music and Hollywood existed so seamless as they do today. The Radio Juxtapoz podcast talks to Merry about those early years, the evolution of the scene and the unique history of underground culture of Los Angeles.

The Radio Juxtapoz podcast is hosted by Fifth Wall TV’s Doug Gillen and Juxtapoz editor, Evan Pricco. Episode 035 was recorded live at DesigerCon 2019.

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035: Getting Pop Surreal with Los Angeles Gallerist, Merry Karnowsky | Radio Juxtapoz | Juxtapoz Magazine

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